‘Bomb cyclone’: How the East Coast winter storm could turn into a monster

Purestock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — When the powerful winter storm that’s moving through the Southeast coast reaches the Northeast on Thursday, it will undergo a rapid intensification or bombogenesis, a term coined by meteorologists.

Bombogenesis occurs when the pressure of a storm drops 24 millibars in 24 hours, or at the rate of 1 millibar per hour. (A millibar is a measure of atmospheric pressure inside a storm, telling meteorologists how strong or weak the storm system is). It usually happens when a storm system moves over the warm waters of the western Atlantic Ocean and the Gulf Stream at the same time that cold, Arctic air moves in from behind. The Northeast coast of the United States experiences this at least once a year.

The difference between the two air masses helps to strengthen the storm system, creating what’s known as bombogenesis.

 As a storm system moves over the Gulf Stream off the East Coast, it picks up all the available moisture and dumps it in the form of snow if there is enough cold air in place.

The lower the storm’s pressure, the stronger the winds are around the storm. This week’s strong winds could wreak havoc, bringing major power outages and coastal flooding for Northeast coastal cities.

Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

RELATED CONTENT

NPR adopts new measures after sex harassment investigation Sheriff: Deputy at Florida school shooting waited during massacre Car features to reduce rear crashes rated by insurance institute Missing CDC employee left work sick 10 days ago, hasn’t been seen since, police say ‘Avid gun owner’ documents ease of buying AR-15 in Facebook post to ‘shine a flashlight’ Reverend Billy Graham To Lie In Honor In U.S. Capitol
Comments