Fifth Circuit Strikes TX Voter ID Law

The Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals struck down part of Texas’ controversial voter ID law.

The court ruled it violates the federal Voting Rights Act.

“It’s a great victory for the voters in Texas,” LULAC’s Luis Vera told KTSA News.

He said the interim relief will hold through November’s election.

“The court will have to implement remedies to make it easier for people to get the voter IDs, not have to pay anything to get it,” he said. “The most important thing is they’ll implement a remedy where if you don’t have an ID, you can get one by doing some type of affidavit that the court will come up with.”

He expects the state to appeal.

Governor Greg Abbott said voter fraud is real.

As Attorney General I prosecuted cases against voter fraud across the State, and Texas will continue to make sure there is no illegal voting at the ballot box,” Abbott said, in a statement.

“It is imperative that the State government safeguards our elections and ensures the integrity of our democratic process,” Attorney General Ken Paxton said, in a statement. Preventing voter fraud is essential to accurately reflecting the will of Texas voters during elections, and it is unfortunate that this common-sense law, providing protections against fraud, was not upheld in its entirety.”

Rebecca L. Robertson, legal and policy director of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) of Texas, said the court ruled the law has a disenfranchising effect on minority voters and doesn’t do anything to prevent fraud.

This law was nothing less than a brazen and transparent attempt to keep people of color out of the voting booth,” Robertson said, in a statement. The case now goes back to the district judge to fashion a remedy that will make it easier for qualified Texans to cast their ballots this fall and we’re hopeful the result will be more fair.”

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