How Old Were You When You Were an “Adult”?

New research from the CBS television network says millennials, on average, don’t consider themselves adults until 30.

We should probably just let ISIS know they’ve won right now, and get that over with.

While parsing data for ratings and audience info, they determined that at age 30, millennials “self-identify”(which I think just means “identify”, but I’m ancient, so what do I know?) as adults.

By which they mean: moving out of mom-and/or-dad’s place, paying their bills, and holding down a J-O-B.

I mean, what’s the rush, right?

For the record, the book “Generations” defines “millennials” as having been born between 1979 and 1995. Which would make the youngest of them 22 this year. In my book, then, every last little craft-beer-drinkin’ one of them is an “adult”, whether they know it or not.

Twenty-two seems like a fine time to be “adulting”. You could have completed a four-year college degree, provided you didn’t change majors like changing underwear. You could’ve completed a hitch in the military. Or polished-off vocational training. Or earned some stripes just, you know, working.

You could’ve voted once or twice.

But thirty?! This could make the “age of consent” thing awkward. Same thing with the drinking age. And clearly letting 18-year-olds vote would be like letting Kevin from “Home Alone” have a ballot. (I think I’d trust him more, anyway. He ran a pretty tight ship as I recall.)

People are going to blame the 2007-09 recession for all this arrested development. I’m not buying that. Student debt? Higher costs for housing? Nah. It’s all relative, kids.

Or did helicopter parenting inhibit the millennial baby birds from leaving the nest? Too much coddling?

So, I have to ask:

When did you become an adult? At what age? Through what experience?

At what age did the younger you meet the adult you?

I’m assuming here that if you’re reading this, it’s already happened. I could be wrong.

E-mail me jack@ktsa.com

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