I’m Still Waiting For A Politician To Answer This

By 1940, 2.5 million residents of the Great Plains had been displaced by the Dust Bowl. It remains the largest migration in American history in that short a time period.

More fairy tales begin with “If I’m elected…” than “Once upon a time…”.

And have you ever noticed how many “problems” politicians invent, so that they can apply the “solution” they already thought up? Answers to questions no one was asking.

Too many of those to list, right?

You know what I’d like answered? Really, actually answered?

What can we do about these insane property appraisals?

The ones that bear no resemblance to your neighborhood comparables.

Keep your gay adoption rules, keep your straight ticket voting and keep your glass walls around the Alamo.

Keep those glass walls, especially. Please. Deal with this instead.

We’re watching property appraisals tax people out of homes they bought because they actually were affordable. Families who’d planned to use the local schools. Empty nesters who thought they’d moved for the last time. I’m not talking about yuppies and McMansion wannabes. People who live within their means.

Until the appraisal notice blew that up.

This year’s candidates scoff at the notion that San Antonio is starting down the path of San Francisco, becoming a city whose natives have to move out to outlying communities, because owning a house here will be too precious.

Great news for places like Schertz or Castroville.  Or maybe not.

So far, I can tell you what I’ve heard: we’re going to cap revenue in Austin (SB2—didn’t happen), we’re going to make it easier to appeal (SB669—appealing is  already easy, it’s winning the appeal that’s hard), we’re going to “talk to the appraisal board” (Mayor Taylor), and a host of “you’re right, we need to ‘address that'” answers from various other solons.

Remember the “Rent Is Too Damn High” fellow? I’m the “Appraisal Is Too Damn High” man.

 

 

 

 

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