‘Twas The Night Before The Election

My first presidential vote was 1984, to reelect Ronald Reagan. With enthusiasm. In Massachusetts. Which he won.

It’s not 1984 anymore.

When we took calls from first-time voters on Monday’s show, it was striking how subdued most of them were. Workmanlike, they described how they made a choice, but not one sounded giddy.

Two thousand-sixteen is the first election where I am more concerned with the aftermath than with the outcome.

Not that the outcome won’t matter, but we won’t shake hands and move on past this contest. Too much has been said that can’t be unsaid, and rifts of all kinds have opened or widened.

In the pursuit of victory and power, politicians have damaged the body politic. I don’t think they care, but you and I will live with it. Better yet, we get to explain the nightly news to our children. That’s been…interesting.

Both candidates warn us that the country’ll go to hell if the other one wins. As if they plan to be elsewhere?

To his credit, Trump sounds positive more than Clinton does. For the last candidate of her generation, she has run an amazingly dour, pessimistic campaign.

Maybe that’s why there seem to be fewer bumper stickers and signs than in prior presidential years. Not as much pride in the choice you’ve made. Too much risk in declaring it among strangers.

Have you noticed that Trump-haters tend to do the same things he does (and that they hate): name-call and villify those who disagree, but not respond with reason or logic?

And have you noticed that Clinton’s toxic stew of disastrous policies and blatant corruption have somehow become…”leadership” and “experience”?

For nearly two years of talking us to death, these campaigns have brought us no closer to resolution or consensus on any issue. Not one. Trump won’t build a wall and Clinton won’t “save” O-care. Most voters know the candidates by their scandals, not for their proposals or much else.

That’s like knowing someone for their tattoos.

From the brilliant Jerry Bowyer:

“I am praying that we will make the right decision tomorrow. But more than all of that I am praying that we will all be ready to deal with whatever the outcome will be.”

It’s not 1984 anymore, except figuratively.

 

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