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Don’t throw away that stimulus debit card, thinking it’s junk mail

Many recipients of the Economic Impact Payment card are throwing them away, think they're fake or a sales promotion/Photo-EIP card website

SAN ANTONIO (KTSA News) – If you get an envelope in the mail  that looks like junk mail from a bank, check it carefully.  Millions of people are getting their federal stimulus funds in the form of a prepaid debit card instead of a check or direct bank  deposit.

KTSA listener Lori Krackau of San Marcos knew she hadn’t applied for a credit card, so when she saw the plain-looking envelope last week, she threw that valuable debit card in the trash.

“The envelope was very plain.  All it said was return service requested from Money Network Cardholder Services in Omaha, Nebraska,” said Krackau. “It looked like a credit card, and I knew that we had not applied for a card, so I ripped the paper literally in half and  threw it in my trashcan in my office at home.”

She left to run some errands and later noticed some friends discussing on Facebook the Economic Impact Payment cards.

“I came home, went  through my trash and found it,” she said with a sigh of relief.

Krackau still had doubts about whether it was real.   The EIP debit card has a Visa logo on the front and Metabank on the back.  That’s the bank that issues the cards.

“There is a slip (of paper) in there that says ‘The Department of the Treasury,’ but it’s not anywhere on the card,” Krackau explained.

She had ripped that paper, which explains what the EIP card is and gives the IRS website address where you can get more information.

Lori Krackau, like many others, threw away her federal stimulus debit card, thinking it was fake, Photo-Courtesy of Lori Krackau

 

When she took the EIP card to her bank, the employee hadn’t seen one, so he did some research and determined the card was valid.  You can make purchases, withdraw cash from ATMs or transfer funds to your bank account.   You can also check the card balance online or on the phone.

If you accidentally threw your EIP debit card away, thinking it was part of a promotion, you’re not alone.   Many others have done just that, and Lori Krackau nearly did.  She contacted KTSA News to warn others to check your junk mail carefully.  That card may be your $1200 or $2400 federal stimulus payment.

It’s important that you call Customer Service at 1.800.240.8100 (TTY: 1.800.241.9100) to report your lost or stolen card immediately.  Fees may apply. You can get more information here. 

 


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