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Some JBSA Randolph families sue over ‘toxic’ privatized housing

SAN ANTONIO (KTSA News) – Eight families at Joint Base San Antonio-Randolph and one at Laughlin Air Force Base in Del Rio have filed a federal lawsuit over what they call “toxic mold and pest-infested privatized housing.”

The suit alleges that Hunt Military Communities , a private contractor, subjected service members and their families to “atrocious conditions.” It says mold was found growing on children’s toys and toothpaste, taking over walls and ductwork.

Mold and Slime-JBSA-Randolph privatized military housing/Photo courtesy of Pulman, Capuccio & Pullen

Kassandra Wolf told KTSA News that she and some of her children became so ill, they required hospitalization.

“Over the last three years, we dealt with mold, we dealt with pest infestation, we had water damage,” said Wolf.

She says her son had severe asthma problems and upper respiratory distress. Wolf says she also suffered numerous health problems which she attributes to the mold.

“I’ve had migraines and nosebleeds, numbness in my hands and feet. It felt like needles and spiders were constantly poking me,” she said. Wolf also blames the mold for incontinence issues.

She says the health problems have not occurred since her family moved out of the privatized housing at Randolph. Her husband is still stationed there, but they have purchased a home away from the base.

Mold in vent/Privatized Military Housing/Photo courtesy of Pulman, Cappuccio & Pullen

“Our citizens need to recognize that these families are the families that are protecting us,” said attorney Jim Moriarty with Pulman, Cappucio & Pullen.

He says when families complained to Hunt, the company “would mislead its tenants about the remediation actions allegedly undertaken.”

“No one should live in the family homes that these people live in and we’re not going to put up with it,” said Moriarty.

The suit alleges the family members suffered mental anguish and that Hunt Military Communities knowingly placed military families in uninhabitable houses.

“We’ve got to fight this through the court of public opinion, fight this through Congress, and as we’ve done today, file suit on behalf of our clients to pursue their rights in the federal courts,” said attorney Ryan Reed, who’s also representing clients in the mass lawsuit.


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